Multifaceted human evolution

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Tall and athletic, Stanislav Nosov is one of the numerous Russian-born Portuguese citizens who grew up in the decline and dismantlement of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and who currently live in Fernando Pessoa’s country. Son of a Siberian mid-wealthy family, Stanislav lived in Russia until the age of 6, period after which he moved to the neighbor Ukraine where he experienced his adolescence. An adolescence filled with hunger and misery. Due to the inherent territorial divisions that the fall of the Soviet Union imposed, all of a sudden Stanislav realized he was a Ukrainian citizen who had to give up on school in order to assure his place at the food rationalized queues where one had to fight for a loaf of bread, for at home there was only pasta, butter and occasionally some eggs. At the age of 12 his survival instinct made him to steal food in order to sell it at markets, furtively. Federated sprinter and medal-awarded at his school, when Stanislav was 14 he got himself involved with problematic ghetto groups from whom he learned how not to fear hunger, work or any other life struggles. This new intrinsic feeling of brotherhood and courage soon taught him lessons of survival, materialized in fish poaching on Ukrainian state waters. Consequently, this risk he was taking forced him to hide in the water for days, sometimes, hoping that the state patrols wouldn’t catch him. These street groups, whom Stanislav called “clans”, mostly stole food, clothing and alcohol. Sunk in this dangerous life style, he was abruptly caught by drugs on a downward spiral that led him to various sport and social problems. This dantesque descent definitely shut the door of a professional athlete career for good, irradiating him from the sport he loved so much. Subsequently his grandmother, for whom he nurtured so much affection, would instill in him strong values of social integrity that made Stanislav break free from his tempestuous journey. Like so many Eastern European families to whom immigration imposed the dream of a better life, the Nosovs got themselves tricked and lost 2000 Euros over a false job offer in England. However, and considering the growing life difficulties, in 2000 the Nosovs would try a new immigration, this time to Portugal, a nation where Stanislav currently lives with his mother. Initially his mother started by doing house cleaning, whereas her son tasted hard work at the quarries. He learned Portuguese mostly on weekends at his bartending part-time job. Once fully adapted to the Portuguese lifestyle, the Nosovs started up a small house cleaning company which would close up due to the economic crisis. It was then that they decided to take over a bookshop, in Braga, and turn it into a convenience store. Today, they are both mediators for Santa Casa da Misericórdia and the adventure has been a positive one. Stanislav discovered the metaphysical side of esotericism when inspired by the nature in the sanctuary of Bom Jesus of Braga. Through his personal rediscovery, and given that sport shapes the body, it would be up to philosophy to encourage his spiritual growth. As a result he studied Philosophy at the Universidade Católica of Braga. The inherent spirituality of kung fu/sanda not only increased the sportive knowledge he already possessed but also developed his leadership skills. The next step would be street workout. His ideal physical shape granted him admiration by amateur athletes, who observed him perform dozens of workouts on exercise bars across city parks and thus a new clan was casually born around 2012: the fellowship of street workout. Under the motto “against drugs, alcohol and a bad lifestyle!”, the embryo for street workout reached its solid associative step when it gathered the support of citizens – doctors, lawyers, teachers, etc – and of the City Hall of Braga itself. Discipline, punctuality and commitment are patterns taken very seriously. Unjustified absences to practice and competitions or the ungracious and incorrect use of equipment can incur in exclusion from the team. Nevertheless, this Russian rigidity is not an inflexible intransigence, for Stanislav keeps an excellent interpersonal relationship with his pupils in a workout environment full of gaiety. In every workout there is a first-aid box as safety is a number one priority for this young man who possesses first aid training. Stanislav also hopes to attain a specific INEM training for workouters. In this sport there are strength trials in which this ex-sprinter evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of each athlete. After these trials a workout plan is defined – one which will allow for optimum performance levels. The street workout’s essence goes beyond mere physical growth insofar as it cannot be taken lightly and without respect for philosophical values. It can be compared to a language of social intervention. No matter what, this sport will always be for free and enemy of commercialism, affirms Stanislav, who assures that this lifestyle aims at conveying a “multifaceted human evolution” to society.